The Matter of the Vanishing Greyhound – Chapter 29, 30, 31 & 32 – Readers and Writers Book Club

The Matter of the Vanishing Greyhound – Chapter 29, 30, 31 & 32

The Matter of the Vanishing Greyhound

Golden Gate Disappearing Greyhound Bus Caper

Steven Levi

Master of the Impossible Crime

Chapter 29

“I stared out of the front of the van window at the two men walking. I’ve been sitting in a van so long I feel like I’m a cop,” Rasperson looked toward the driveway on Ruef Avenue. “Where did the thin guy come from?”

“Have you seen him before?” Noonan was peering at the pair through binoculars.

“Yeah. I saw him and a guy built like a bowling ball go up to Harrah’s office.”

“How do you know they were going to Harrah’s office?” Smith looked over her right shoulder at Rasperson in the cargo area.

“He’s got a private elevator to his office. He’s the only one who uses it. I saw him go up and then a little later, these two hoods went up.”

“What makes you think they’re hoods?”

“Because only four people went up to the Harrah’s office the day after the robbery: Harrah, Hopkins, this guy and his partner. It was at seven in the morning let me quickly add. Why do I think they’re hoods? Because that’s the way I’d do business. The day after a robbery of my $10 mill I’d have my heavyweights looking into the situation right away.”

“Good guess,” Smith said. “Any idea that they are?”

“Not a one.”

“We’ve been running on luck all afternoon,” Smith said.

“No,” said Noonan. “We’ve been running on good police work all afternoon, Detective. This is how crimes are solved. Luck doesn’t have a lot to do with it.” Noonan put his binoculars down and dropped them into a duffel bag on the floor. “It’s too dark to use these. Now, don’t lose those two. If I’m right, they’re going to lead us directly to the English Petroleum’s $10 million.”

The Matter of the Vanishing Greyhound

Golden Gate Disappearing Greyhound Bus Caper

Steven Levi

Master of the Impossible Crime

Chapter 30

The speaker came on so unexpectedly the hostages jumped in unison.

“This will be your last transfer.”

The voice came over a loud voice was not that of John.

“Listen very carefully. There have been major complications we are endeavoring to work out right now. Once again, let me make it as clear as glass, we expect no trouble from you and will tolerate none. In five minutes the front door will be opened and you will queue up again. When you hear a knock on the door, walk directly into the vehicle in front of you. Do not look to the left or right. Just walk straight ahead. So far we have had no problems, don’t be a problem now. If all is well you should be home by midnight, alive and well with a great story for your children.”

“What if we don’t have children?” Freesia yelled.

But there must not have been any wiring to take incoming questions as the voice continued as though no statement had been made from the hostages.

“It’s been a long day and it is almost over. Let’s not ruin such a splendid relationship by any last-minute stupidity.”

The Matter of the Vanishing Greyhound

Golden Gate Disappearing Greyhound Bus Caper

Steven Levi

Master of the Impossible Crime

Chapter 31

“Where is he now?”

“Still at the St. Francis Hotel. Where are you?”

“Enroute.”

“Keep me informed. I’ve got my tickets and bags.”

“Over and out.”

The Matter of the Vanishing Greyhound

Golden Gate Disappearing Greyhound Bus Caper

Steven Levi

Master of the Impossible Crime

Chapter 32

“Now let’s see our seven million.” John waved a gun at Hopkins indicating he should pull away from the curb.

“Put the gun away, John. It makes me nervous.”

“Having to deal with you makes me nervous, Hopkins. This wasn’t in the plan.”

“I’m not real pleased at being here either.”

“It’s not what you said this afternoon, Douglas. I don’t like the way things have been twisting. This smells like a double-cross.”

John took a look over the leading edge of the dashboard and then hunkered down again. He tapped Hopkins in the ribs with his pistol without saying anything. But the action didn’t require any vocabulary.

“Give me a break, John. What am I going to get out of a double-cross? You get out of town, and I get a million. You get caught, I get zip. What have I got to gain by turning you in?”

“Seven million dollars, Hopkins. You think we’re stupid, don’t you? Clever little plan it is too. English Petroleum gets their 10 million, we get seven and a-maz-ing-ly we get picked up by the constabulary. No honor among thieves, eh?”

“How does it get me seven million dollars?”

“Because the seven million doesn’t exist. English Petroleum won’t claim it. If they do they’ll have to explain what they were doing with it. Even if there isn’t a law against having seven million dollars, the IRS is going to wonder about it. No. English Petroleum isn’t going to squeal over $7 million. Ergo, once we make the switch, you don’t need us. You’ve got seven million reasons to turn us in.”

“Well, if you’re so sure I’m going to double-cross you, why are you dealing with me?”

“Because I have no choice.” John paused for a moment and then waved the gun at Hopkins. “But I can assure you if there is any hanky-panky I will not hesitate to use this. Period. If it looks like we go to prison, you go to the graveyard.”

“But if you go to prison, I go too.”

“You’re a cockroach, Hopkins. A cockroach will survive a nuclear war. No, you’re the kind of slime who would stack our bodies one on top of the other to reach a pizza counter. You just do exactly what you’re told. Now. Let’s go.”

Steven C. Levi is a sixty-something freelance historian and commercial writer who lives in Anchorage, Alaska, his home for past 40 years. He has a BA in European History and MA in American history from the University of California Davis and San Jose State. He has more than 80 books in print or on Kindle. 

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